hunterdimin:

truefoes:

Ingmar Bergman — ca. 1936.

happy birthday Ingmar!

hunterdimin:

truefoes:

Ingmar Bergman — ca. 1936.

happy birthday Ingmar!

writerdirector:

Insight into Richard Linkater’s process. Less practical than theoretical, the article addresses five bastions of great storytelling, according to the consummate independent filmmaker.

Find Your Form First

“There are a lot of stories in the world, and I spend all my time…

elvisgal:


↳ Bogie and Bacall - A Masterpost.

Few Hollywood romances were as legendary as Bogie and Bacall’s. The beautiful Betty was only 19 when she met Humphrey (who was married at the time) on the set of their upcoming movie ‘To Have And Have Not’ in 1944. However their 25 year age gap and Bogart’s marital status didn’t seem to stop a romance from forming between the two stars. After divorcing his wife in February, 1945, he proposed to Bacall and Bogie and his ‘Baby’ were married just months later on May 21st, 1945 at Malabar Farm in Ohio. They stayed blissfully wed, had two children together and were very much in love with each other until his untimely death in 1957. At Bogie’s funeral, Bacall placed a small golden whistle that had once been a part of a charm bracelet he had given to her before they married. It was inscribed with a quote from their first movie together - "If you want anything, just whistle."
1944 - To Have And Have Not | WATCH/DOWNLOAD registration not required!1946 - The Big Sleep | WATCH/DOWNLOAD registration not required!1947 - Dark Passage | WATCH/DOWNLOAD registration not required!1948 - Key Largo | WATCH + WATCH/DOWNLOAD must register to download!
(please report broken links so they can be replaced!)

elvisgal:

↳ Bogie and Bacall - A Masterpost.

Few Hollywood romances were as legendary as Bogie and Bacall’s. The beautiful Betty was only 19 when she met Humphrey (who was married at the time) on the set of their upcoming movie ‘To Have And Have Not’ in 1944. However their 25 year age gap and Bogart’s marital status didn’t seem to stop a romance from forming between the two stars. After divorcing his wife in February, 1945, he proposed to Bacall and Bogie and his ‘Baby’ were married just months later on May 21st, 1945 at Malabar Farm in Ohio. They stayed blissfully wed, had two children together and were very much in love with each other until his untimely death in 1957. At Bogie’s funeral, Bacall placed a small golden whistle that had once been a part of a charm bracelet he had given to her before they married. It was inscribed with a quote from their first movie together - "If you want anything, just whistle."

1944 - To Have And Have Not | WATCH/DOWNLOAD registration not required!
1946 - The Big Sleep | WATCH/DOWNLOAD registration not required!
1947 - Dark Passage | WATCH/DOWNLOAD registration not required!
1948 - Key Largo | WATCH + WATCH/DOWNLOAD must register to download!

(please report broken links so they can be replaced!)

cinephiliabeyond:

A-BitterSweet-Life presents Cinéma! Cinéma! The French New Wave (1992), an intimate window into one of the great movements in film history that brought about an evolution in the art of cinema. A cinematic revolution, the French New Wave offered a change in filmmaking through its regard for the auteur theory, developments in editing and story structure, approach to production, and more. As a 50 minute documentary, Cinema! Cinema! The French New Wave perfectly portrays the revolution with insight on the lives and works of Jean-Luc Godard, François Truffaut, and other principal players in the New Wave while sharing why filmmakers such as Martin Scorsese and Arthur Penn feel the movement to be so crucial to filmmaking.

Also, recommended viewing: Two in the Wave is the story of a friendship. Jean-Luc Godard was born in 1930; François Truffaut two years later. Love of movies brings them together. They write in the same magazines, Cahiers du Cinéma and Arts. When the younger of the two becomes a filmmaker with The 400 Blows, which triumphs in Cannes in 1959, he helps his older friend shift to directing, offering him a screenplay which already has a title, A bout de souffle, or Breathless. Through the 1960s the two loyally support each other. History and politics separate them in 1968, when Godard plunges into radical politics but Truffaut continues his career as before. Between the two of them, the actor Jean-Pierre Leaud is torn like a child caught between two separated and warring parents. Their friendship and their break-up embody the story of French cinema.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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cinephiliabeyond:

A-BitterSweet-Life presents Cinéma! Cinéma! The French New Wave (1992), an intimate window into one of the great movements in film history that brought about an evolution in the art of cinema. A cinematic revolution, the French New Wave offered a change in filmmaking through its regard for the auteur theory, developments in editing and story structure, approach to production, and more. As a 50 minute documentary, Cinema! Cinema! The French New Wave perfectly portrays the revolution with insight on the lives and works of Jean-Luc Godard, François Truffaut, and other principal players in the New Wave while sharing why filmmakers such as Martin Scorsese and Arthur Penn feel the movement to be so crucial to filmmaking.

Also, recommended viewing: Two in the Wave is the story of a friendship. Jean-Luc Godard was born in 1930; François Truffaut two years later. Love of movies brings them together. They write in the same magazines, Cahiers du Cinéma and Arts. When the younger of the two becomes a filmmaker with The 400 Blows, which triumphs in Cannes in 1959, he helps his older friend shift to directing, offering him a screenplay which already has a title, A bout de souffle, or Breathless. Through the 1960s the two loyally support each other. History and politics separate them in 1968, when Godard plunges into radical politics but Truffaut continues his career as before. Between the two of them, the actor Jean-Pierre Leaud is torn like a child caught between two separated and warring parents. Their friendship and their break-up embody the story of French cinema.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

(via eyeprotein)

itsaprettylittleblog:

My favorite part of last night’s episode (5x03) was the part where Ali sees that painting in the Funeral Home and acts really weird.. Like I felt like it had to be somehow meaningful. So I looked up the painting - it’s called “Isle of the Dead” by Arnold Böcklin.

image

I found an interesting…

reservoir-devotchkas:

cybugs:

i compiled some pics of dreamworks female characters who were introduced in the same years as disney female characters- rapunzel, anna, and honey lemon

its up to you to decide which company is more progressive when designing female characters who appear distinct from the company’s last female protagonist, even tho its sorta extremely obvious  

hang ur head in shame, disney -_-

"Every good writer or filmmaker has something eating away at them, right? They can’t quite get off their back. And so your job is to make your audience care about your obsession."

— Bruce Springsteen (via imkindathatweirdkid)

(via scriptanalytics)

Download

thefilmstage:

Photos by a young Stanley Kubrick, taken in the 1940’s while employed by Look Magazine. [x] [Set 2 of 2]